Working Dogs of America
To Serve and Protect
WDA

Working Dog Registry and Titling program for protection, obedience & tracking
 
I miss you , most at the end of the day when I stop everything to make your dinner and talk to you, so I don’t make mach for dinner

Protection Sport Obedience Dog 1 (PSOB1)

 

Obedience Exercises

Points

Reporting to the Judge

5

Long Down

10

Heeling off Leash Or On leash

25

Sit out of Motion

15

Down & Recall

15

Retrieves

30

TOTAL POINTS

100

 

General Rules for the PSOB1

A.  Eligibility: To perform the PSOB1 routine a dog must have earned an FO title or higher title. Must be 12 months old.

B.  Collar: Only one collar is allowed on the dog for the both phases. Single collars include the following: flat, choke chain, fur saver or similar types of slip collars, all used on a dead ring.

C.  Leash and leash option: The PS1/PSOB1 allows handlers the option of performing any exercise in the obedience phase of the class off leash except where a leash is required. However, exercising this option does not earn any additional points. The Sit out of Motion and Down Out of Motion and Recall exercises must be performed off leash. The leash is to be held in the left hand when heeling. Whenever the leash is removed, the handler must put it away, or hang it around their shoulder or waist with the clasp positioned on the right side of the handler’s body.

A dog must be leashed when:

1.   First reporting to the Judge or Steward

2.   When doing the long down honoring exercise;

3.   End of class as soon as all the exercises have been completed;

4.   Whenever a Judge is critiquing the score;

5.   Whenever the Judge instructs the handler to place a leash on the dog.

6.   When re-attaching the leash any time while on trial field it is to be on a dead ring.

 

D.  Praise: When reporting to all assigned areas, teams are required to maintain formal heeling with mild praise permissible once arriving at the start position for the next exercise.

E.  Call name: A handler may use the dog’s name prior to any command.

F.   When heeling is required: For the Obedience Routine, dog/handler teams are required to perform formal heeling when reporting to all designated areas.

G.  Heeling & hands: The dog should always heel close to the left knee of the handler and the shoulder blade of the dog should be aligned next to the handler’s knee. The dog must not forge ahead, move to the side or lag to the rear. A dog that demonstrates positive, energetic, attentive behavior toward the handler is very desirable. The handler should walk freely with both arms moving freely as if the dog wasn’t there.  All exercises begin and end in the basic position.

H.  Left about turns: Are to be performed as either the (German turn) where the dog circles around the handler, or back up in place (FCI International/military) where the dog stays in heel position as the handler turns left. The handler and dog must execute the same turn throughout the obedience phase.

I.     Neutrality test: During its entire performance, a dog is under the neutrality test. A dog that shows extreme aggression, fear, shyness or whose demeanor gives the Judge reason to believe that the dog may not safely be judged may be given a non-qualifying score and excused from the ring and further participation in that trial.

J.   Judge’s instructions: Any place these rules state “Judge’s Instruction” the Judge or Steward can give the instruction.

K.  Qualifying score PS1 title:

1.   PSOB1 title. A qualifying score in the Obedience Phase of the PS1 class requires the passing of the Obedience phase with a score of 70 points or more. Passing the PS1 Obedience Phase qualifies the dog to earn the PSOB1 title.

L.   Scoring note: The score sheet for each exercise has multiple listed features that the Judge is required to assess to determine point deductions. However, the Judge must also assess major or minor imperfection deductions that are not listed on the score sheet for any other deviations from the ideal performance.

M. Acknowledging the Judge and critique: For the PSOB1 exercises all handlers are responsible for acknowledging the Judge for instructions on when to report and when concluding the routine. The Judge shall instruct all dog/handler teams where and when to report to receive a critique of the performance and the announcement of the score.

N.  Judge’s note for all evaluations: The Judge will be evaluating the handler and dog on the basis of an ideal performance. All of the listed reasons for deductions are given as a guide for handlers to have some idea of what is expected. The Judge must assess deductions for other behavior that is not covered or that takes away from the ideal performance. In addition, the Judge will be assessing the dog’s attitude, attention to the handler and the willingness to perform the required exercises. Dogs that display an energetic attitude and are attentive and responsive to their handler will receive the most points.

O.  Knowledge of the routine is scored: The Judge/Steward will announce the exercise to be performed and will then indicate to the handler to start the exercise.

1.   Handlers are required to know all exercises and will lose points if performed incorrectly. The point loss will be proportionate to the error and circumstance. This loss can be .5 to 1.5 for minor to as much as 2 to 4 points for major. 

2.   Because improper use of equipment can be a safety issue or even an advantage, 1/2 of that exercise’s points will be deducted for reporting with the wrong equipment. The equipment will be corrected prior to continuing. Point deduction will be taken upon handler entering the trial field with wrong equipment.

 

P.  Knowledge of the routine is scored: The Judge/Steward will announce the exercise to be performed and will then indicate to the handler to start the exercise. Handlers are required to know all exercises and will lose points if performed incorrectly. The point loss will be proportionate to the error and circumstance. This loss can be .5 to 1.5 for minor to as much as 2 to 4 points for major. Because improper use of equipment can be a safety issue or even an advantage, 1/2 of that exercises points will be deducted for reporting with the wrong equipment. The equipment will be corrected prior to continuing. Point deduction will be taken at finish of hand shake in reporting to judge and after the handler acknowledges the Judge for all other exercises.

Note: All other general rules on our “general rule page” also apply.  See that page here. General Rules

Obedience Routine of the Protection Sport Dog 1 (PSOB1)

1.   Reporting to the Judge Exercise. The primary purpose of this exercise is to show that the dog/handler team can demonstrate proper heeling and control of a dog while reporting to the Judge. In addition, this exercise is used as a starting point for evaluating temperament and for determining whether the team is suitable for performing the evaluation. Dogs that display extreme shyness or extreme aggression will be excused from further participation.

a)   Judge’s Instructions. The Judge indicates to the handlers when and where to report, when to begin the exercise, where to report for the heeling exercise and where to report for conducting the long down.

b)  Exercise Instructions. The Obedience phase starts with two dog/handler teams reporting to the Judge. The handlers report with their dogs on leash, demonstrating proper heeling. Once reaching the Judge, each handler halts with the dog automatically sitting and maintaining a sit throughout the introduction. Handlers are responsible for a formal introduction that includes introducing themselves, giving the dog’s name, stating the type of class for which they are reporting, whether the dog’s heeling exercises will be performed on or off leash and what type of finish the dog performs. On the dog’s score sheet, the Judge notes the handler’s heeling choice and type of finish, after which time the handler shall be committed to the heeling choice as accepted by the Judge. After the introductions, the Judge indicates which team reports for the heeling exercise and which team reports for the long down or honoring exercise.

c)   Scoring the Reporting to the Judge Exercise. This exercise is evaluated primarily on the ability of the dog/handler team to perform a formal introduction to start the routine. The Judge evaluates heeling, introduction procedure and the dog’s behavior during introductions. The dog should display neutral, well-mannered behavior toward the Judge and the other dog/handler team.

Note: If a dog is ruled extremely shy or aggressive, unruly or out of control, the Judge may excuse the dog and handler from performing any additional exercises.

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) Score. The following must be given a zero on this exercise.

a.   Dog is ruled out of control;

b.   Dog receives more than three commands to sit during the introductions and instructions;

c.   Handler forcing the dog to sit; or

d.   Rough treatment of a dog by a handler.

2)   Imperfections may be judged as major or minor depending on the extent of the following:

a.   Dog is very slow to sit;

b.   Incomplete sit (hovering/space between butt and ground);

c.   Handler gives an extra command;

d.   Improper heeling approaching or leaving the Judge;

e.   Dog’s heeling could be better;

f.     Dog is dull and needs more enthusiasm;

g.   Dog moves slightly during the sit; or

h.   Dog sits crooked.

 

2.   Long Down or Honoring Exercise. The primary element of this exercise is to demonstrate the honoring dog’s ability to remain in the down position while distracted by the presence of the other dog/handler team.

a)   Judge’s Instruction. The Judge indicates where to perform the long down, when the exercise begins, when to re-sit the dog from the down, when the exercise is finished and where to report.     

b)  Exercise Instructions. The long down or honoring exercise starts after the handler reaches the designated area. After acknowledging the Judge, the handler with a single voice or signal command (not both) commands the dog to down. The handler remains beside the dog holding the leash or may drop the leash by the dog and stand on the end; the leash must remain loose and not restrain the dog. The dog must remain in its assigned position while the other dog handler/team performs their routines. After the other dog/handler team completes the retrieve exercises, the handler acknowledges the Judge and on the Judge’s order, the handler verbally commands the dog to sit. Once again, the handler acknowledges the Judge and waits for Judge’s order to report.

c)   Scoring the Long Down or Honoring Exercise. The honoring exercise is primarily evaluated on the ability of the dog to demonstrate a long down while the other dog/handler team performs their required exercises. The exercise evaluation begins when the handler acknowledges the Judge to start the exercise. The dog should down quickly and remain calm and stationary.

1)   Non-Qualifying (Zero) score. The following must be given a zero on this exercise.

a.   Dog refuses to down after three commands;

b.   Handler pushes or touches the dog to make it down;

c.   Handler uses leash to make the dog down;  or

d.   Dog moves substantially or stands up before the other dog/handler team has completed half of their routine.

2)   Imperfections may be judged as major or minor depending on the extent of the following:

a.   Dog needs a double command to down;

b.   Handler uses too much body language when giving the down command;

c.   Dog is very slow to down;

d.   Dog moves a substantial distance by creeping or crawling;

e.   Dog refuses to re-sit;

f.     Dog is slow to down;

g.   Dog moves slightly;

h.   Dog whines or barks excessively;

i.     Dog’s re-sit is slow;

j.     Incomplete sit (hovering/space between butt and ground); or

k.   Dog’s performance is dull or sluggish.

 

3.   Heeling on or off Leash Exercise. The primary purposes of these exercises are to demonstrate the ability of the dog and handler to work smoothly as a team and the ability of the dog to stay in the heel position.

a)   Judge’s Instructions. The Judge indicates where to start, when the handler is to remove the leash when to start, when to restart after each halt, when to leave the markers and when the exercise is complete.

b)  Exercise Instructions. The handler and dog (on leash) report to the correct area as specified by the Judge. Handler removes the leash and puts it away if the exercise is going to be performed off leash. The heeling exercise starts with the handler acknowledging the Judge and the dog in the basic position. The dog should willingly and freely follow the handler upon the voice command to heel. At the beginning of the exercise, the handler must proceed in a straight line 40 to 50 normal paces without stopping. A left turn about is performed and after 10 to 15 paces of normal heeling, a running exercise and a slow exercise, each of at least 10 to 15 paces are to be demonstrated. The handler must go directly from the fast pace to the slow pace and then back to normal pace. Each change of pace allows the handler to give a single heel command. After the slow pace, the handler resumes normal pace and continues another 10 to 15 paces and then performs a right turn for 10 to 15 paces and then another right turn and continues forward for another 20 paces and then performs a left turn about and continues another 10 to 15 paces and halt. At this time, the handler acknowledges the Judge and continues another 10 to 15 paces and performs a left turn and then continues heeling toward a set of markers (obstacles) where the handler must perform a heeling pattern around the markers. The markers shall be rubber cones or similar objects placed on the corners of a rectangle approximately eight to ten square feet. When entering the markers, a right and left turn must be demonstrated, after the turns, the handler halts and the dog sits (in the basic position) within the group of markers. The handler acknowledges the Judge, continues heeling back to the original starting position, and performs a halt. The handler then acknowledges the Judge for concluding the exercise.

Additional instructions for this exercise concern the actions of the handler. The handler is only permitted to use voice commands when starting the exercise and when changing pace. When the handler comes to a stop, the dog should sit in the basic position without being influenced by the handler. During the halt, the handler is not permitted to change the basic position and must not step sideways toward the dog.

c)   Scoring the Heeling on or off Leash Exercise: The Judge is evaluating the correctness of the heeling position and the behavior of the dog. Dogs that display positive, energetic attitudes and attentiveness to the handler are most desirable.

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) scores. The following must be given a zero score on this exercise:

a.   Handler giving the dog constant or repeated extra commands or signals;

b.   Handler slapping the leg or snapping fingers repeatedly;

c.   Handler continually adapting pace to dog;

d.   Unqualified heeling; or

e.   Dog breaks or leaves the handler’s side and cannot regain its composure and resume heeling.

2)   Imperfections may be judged as major or minor depending on the extent of the following:

a.   Handler moving forward and then giving a “heel” command shall be penalized a major imperfection;

b.   Handler gives a signal command to heel;

c.   Handler giving extra commands or signals;

d.   Dog moves out of the basic heel position before a command from the handler;

e.   Dog anticipating command;

f.     Dog crowding the handler, forging, heeling wide, heeling in an improper position, lagging, poor sitting on the halts, sniffing and any other additional heeling imperfections;

g.   Dog fails to stop and sit automatically in the proper basic position each time the handler is required to “Halt”;

h.   Incomplete sit (hovering/space between butt and ground);

i.     Failure to change pace by the dog or handler during the fast or slow portion of the heeling exercise;

j.     Dog sniffs a Steward or marker; or

k.   Lacks natural smoothness.

 

4.   Sit Out of Motion Exercise. The principal purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate the dog’s ability to perform heeling and upon a verbal command from the handler, perform a stationary sit while the handler proceeds in straight line without stopping, turns to face the dog and returns to the dog at the end of the exercise.

 

a)   Judge’s Instruction. The Judge indicates where and when to start, when to return to the dog after the sit, and when the exercise is complete.

b)  Exercise Instructions. The dog/handler team reports to the designated area as indicated by the Judge. The handler will acknowledge the Judge, remove the leash (if attached) and from the basic position, the handler and a free heeling dog will proceed in a straight line for a minimum of 10 or maximum of 15 paces, and upon voice command by the handler, the dog should move quickly into the sit position while the handler does not interrupt their pace nor turn about. After another minimum of 10 or maximum of 15 paces, the handler stops and turns around to face the dog. When instructed by the Judge, the handler will return to the dog and assume the basic position on the right side of the dog. The handler will then acknowledge the Judge for concluding the exercise. A period of approximately 3 seconds is observed prior to the Judge’s orders for returning to the dog and another approximate 3 seconds is observed when the handler returns to the dog’s side before acknowledging the Judge for concluding the exercise.

c)   Scoring the Sit Out of Motion Exercise. Scoring of this exercise starts after the Judge acknowledges the handler to start. The Judge is evaluating proper heeling, response to the sit command, handler’s actions and the behavior and performance of the dog. Dogs that demonstrate positive, energetic, attentive behavior toward the handler and perform with quick responses will receive the most points.

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) score. The following must be given a zero score on this exercise:

a.   Handler gives more than two extra commands to sit;

b.   Dog moves a substantial distance away from the place where it was sitting;

c.   Dog does not sit but continues with the handler; or

d.   The handler totally interrupts their pace or comes back to sit the dog directly after giving the command to sit.

2)   Imperfections may be judged as major or minor depending on the extent of the following:

a.   Dog doesn’t sit but stands or lies down;

b.   Dog doesn’t maintain proper heeling position;

c.   Dog sits extremely slowly;

d.   Dog lies down before the exercise is complete;

e.   Handler gives any kind of body language when giving the sit command;

f.     Handler turns and looks back at the dog when the sit command is given or while leaving the dog;

g.   Dog moves prior to the heel command;

h.   Dog sits slowly or moves slightly;

i.     Incomplete sit (hovering/space between butt and ground);

j.     Dog whines or barks;

k.   Handler doesn’t acknowledge the Judge when starting and finishing the exercise;

l.     Dog shows pressure when the handler returns; or

m. The overall performance is not well executed.

 

5.   Down with Recall Exercise. The primary purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate that a dog/handler team can perform formal heeling, a down out of motion, a recall, front and finish or a straight to finish exercise.

a)   Judge’s Instructions. The Judge indicates to the handler where to start, when to start, when to recall the dog and when the exercise is finished.

b)  Exercise Instructions. The Down with Recall exercise starts with the dog/handler team reporting to the original starting position assigned by the Judge. The handler reports with their dog in the basic position and acknowledges the Judge. The dog/handler team then demonstrates normal pace off leash heeling in a straight line for minimum of 10 or maximum of 15 paces without stopping, and upon voice command, the dog is commanded to down. The handler proceeds walking in a straight line a minimum of 40 paces turns and faces the dog. Upon the Judge’s instructions, the handler will recall the dog. The dog should come to the handler and perform a front and finish or a straight to side finish; the type of finish must be the same as indicated to the Judge when the team reported. When the dog performs a front, the handler should wait approximately three seconds and then command the dog back into the basic position. The handler then acknowledges the Judge. The Judge’s evaluation of the down and recall exercise ends once the handler acknowledges the Judge.

c)   Scoring the Down and Recall Exercise. Scoring this exercise starts after the handler acknowledges the Judge. The Judge is evaluating formal heeling, performance of the down and the recall exercise. The Judge is also evaluating the overall smoothness of the entire exercise.

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) score. The following must be given a zero score on this exercise:

a.   Handler gives two extra commands or signal to “stay” after leaving the dog;

b.   Dog refuses to come to the handler;

c.   Dog follows the handler when leaving the dog in the down position; or

d.   Handler moves from the stationary position on the recall.

2)   Imperfections may be judged as major or minor depending on the extent of the following:

a.   Improper heeling throughout the routine;

b.   Dog moves a substantial distance in the down by crawling or creeping;

c.   Dog stands prior to recall;

d.   Dog anticipates the recall;

e.   Dog is very slow coming to the handler;

f.     Dog does the wrong finish;

g.   Handler gives extra commands;

h.   Handler gives the down command with body language;

i.     Dog heels improperly for part of the routine;

j.     Attitude of the dog is dull and not attentive to handler;

k.   Slow down;

l.     Creeping or moving slightly;

m. Dog could come faster;

n.   Incomplete sit (hovering/space between butt and ground);

o.   Overall routine could be smoother; or

p.   Handler doesn’t acknowledge the Judge.

 

The agility equipment requirements are listed on equipment page.   Equipment

The hurdle and A frame will be set to the side of field in line and along with other jumps used for the other classes.

 

1.   Flat Retrieve. The principal purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate the willingness of dog to retrieve an object thrown by the handler.

a)   Judge’s Instruction.  The Judge indicates where and when to start the exercise and when the exercise is complete.

b)  Exercise Instructions. The exercise starts by acknowledging the Judge with the dog in the basic position and off leash. The dog/handler team demonstrates proper heeling and control as they report to a designated area where the handler obtains the object to be retrieved by the dog. The handler should heel the dog to within 2 paces of the location of the object and place the dog in a sit. The handler leaves the dog in the sit position, obtains an approved object, returns to the dog and demonstrates heeling to the designated area for performing the flat retrieve exercise. (The trial host shall provide a wooden dumbbell approved by the Judge. However, each handler may bring their own object which should be their own wooden dumbbell, wallet, small purse, retrieving bumper, jute roll or other type of similar object which must have first been approved by the Judge) Once reaching the designated area, the handler acknowledges the Judge and then throws or pitches the object a minimum of 10 paces away from the dog. The dog remains in the sit position until the handler gives the command to retrieve. The handler allows a three second pause between the time the object comes to rest and when the command to retrieve is given. Upon a single voice command, the dog leaves the handler’s side and goes directly to the object, retrieves it and returns to the handler performing a front sit position where the handler can easily take the object from the dog without moving. The dog’s speed going to and coming from the retrieve should be the same. The dog holds the object in its mouth while maintaining the sit position for at least 3 seconds before the handler commands the dog to release the object and takes it from the dog. The handler secures the retrieved object by putting it away or placing it under either armpit; the handler then commands the dog back into the basic finish position. After the dog returns to the basic position, the handler acknowledges the Judge for concluding the exercise.

c)   Scoring the Flat Retrieve Exercise. Scoring of this exercise begins when the Judge acknowledges the handler to start. The primary area the Judge is evaluating for obtaining the most points is the willingness of the dog to retrieve the object and the control the handler displays over the dog. The Judge awards the most points to a dog that demonstrates eagerness, willingness, speed and enthusiasm to retrieve the selected object.

Note: Mouthing the object slightly is not a fault and excessive mouthing will have a maximum one-point deduction providing the dog does not drop the retrieved object prior to the handler taking it from the dog.

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) Score. The following must be given a zero score on this exercise:

a.   Dog refuses to go out on the second command;

b.   Dog does not retrieve the object;

c.   Handler moves from the stationary position when the object is thrown;

d.   Dog refuses to release the object; or

e.   Handler uses any form of rough correction to get the dog to release the retrieved object.

2)   Imperfections may be judged as major or minor depending on the extent of the following:

a.   Handler gives extra verbal or signal command(s);

b.   Dog is very slow or reluctant in performing the exercise;

c.   Dog leaves the handler’s side prior to giving the command to retrieve;

d.   Dog sits too far back from the handler to comfortably take the object from the dog;

e.   Dog is very slow in releasing the object or a double command is given; or

f.     Dog drops the object prior to the handler taking it from the dog’s mouth.

g.   Dog demonstrates pressure or reluctance to perform the exercise;

h.   Speed of the retrieve going and coming is significantly different;

i.     Mouthing the object to a point the object is difficult for the handler to retrieve from the dog;

j.     Dog is slow in its release or the object must be pulled slightly;

k.   Dog sits crooked or returns to the basic position;

l.     Handler help or assistance that deviates slightly from the ideal;

m. Dog’s pick-up of the object is slow; or

n.   Dog doesn’t go directly to the object and return directly to the handler with the object. The deduction depends on the degree of deviation from the most direct route.

 

2.   Retrieve over the Hurdle. The principal purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate the willingness of dog to retrieve an object thrown by the handler over a hurdle.

a)   Judge’s Instruction. The Judge indicates where and when to start the exercise and when the exercise is complete.

b)  Exercise Instructions. The exercise starts by acknowledging the Judge with the dog in the basic position and off leash. The dog/handler team demonstrates proper heeling and control as they report to a designated area. Once reaching the designated area, the handler acknowledges the Judge and then throws or pitches the object a minimum of 10 paces away over the hurdle. The handler allows a three second pause between the time the object comes to rest and when the command to jump is given. The dog remains in the sit position until the handler gives the command to jump. On a single voice command to jump, the dog leaves the handler’s side and goes directly over the hurdle, while in air the command to bring/fetch is given. The dog’s speed going to and coming from the retrieve should be the same. The dog must jump without touching the hurdle, retrieve object, jump back over the hurdle and sit in front of its handler holding the object in its mouth for at least 3 seconds before the handler takes it on the command “out”.  The handler secures the retrieved object by putting it away or placing it under either armpit; the handler then commands the dog back into the basic finish position. After the dog returns to the basic position, the handler acknowledges the Judge for concluding the exercise.

c)   Scoring the Retrieve over the Hurdle Exercise. Scoring of this exercise begins when the Judge acknowledges the handler to start. The primary area the Judge is evaluating for obtaining the most points is the willingness of the dog to jump and retrieve the object and the control the handler displays over the dog. The Judge awards the most points to a dog that demonstrates eagerness, willingness, speed and enthusiasm to jump and retrieve the selected object.

Note: Mouthing the object slightly is not a fault and excessive mouthing will have a maximum one point deduction providing the dog does not drop the retrieved object prior to the handler taking it from the dog.

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) Score. The following must be given a zero score on this exercise:

a.   Dog refuses to go out on the second command;

b.   Dog does not retrieve the object;

c.   Dog dose not jump the hurdle at least one direction;

d.   Handler moves from the stationary position when the object is thrown;

e.   Dog refuses to release the object; or

f.     Handler uses any form of rough correction to get the dog to release the retrieved object.

2)   Imperfections may be judged as major or minor depending on the extent of the following:

a.   Dog only jumps one direction;

b.   Handler gives extra verbal or signal command(s);

c.   Dog is very slow or reluctant in performing the exercise;

d.   Dog leaves the handler’s side prior to giving the command to retrieve;

e.   Dog sits too far back from the handler to comfortably take the object from the dog;

f.     Dog is very slow in releasing the object or a double command is given; or

g.   Dog drops the object prior to the handler taking it from the dog’s mouth.

h.   Dog demonstrates pressure or reluctance to perform the exercise;

i.     Speed of the retrieve going and coming is significantly different;

j.     Mouthing the object to a point the object is difficult for the handler to retrieve from the dog;

k.   Dog is slow in its release or the object must be pulled slightly;

l.     Dog sits crooked or returns to the basic position;

m. Handler help or assistance that deviates slightly from the ideal;

n.   Dog’s pick-up of the object is slow; or

o.   Dog doesn’t go directly to the object and return directly to the handler with the object. The deduction depends on the degree of deviation from the most direct route.

 

3.   Retrieve over the A frame. The principal purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate the willingness of dog to retrieve an object thrown by the handler over an A frame.

a)   Judge’s Instruction. The Judge indicates where and when to start the exercise and when the exercise is complete.

b)  Exercise Instructions. The exercise starts by acknowledging the Judge with the dog in the basic position and off leash. The dog/handler team demonstrates proper heeling and control as they report to a designated area. Once reaching the designated area, the handler acknowledges the Judge and then throws or pitches the object a minimum of 10 paces away over the A frame. The handler allows a three second pause between the time the object comes to rest and when the command to jump is given. The dog remains in the sit position until the handler gives the command to jump. On a single voice command to jump, the dog leaves the handler’s side and goes directly over the A frame, while on top of the A frame the command to bring/fetch is given. The dog’s speed going to and coming from the retrieve should be the same. The dog must scale the A frame, retrieve object, scale back over the A frame and sit in front of its handler holding the object in its mouth for at least 3 seconds before the handler takes it on the command “out”.  The handler secures the retrieved object by putting it away or placing it under either armpit; the handler then commands the dog back into the basic finish position. After the dog returns to the basic position, the handler acknowledges the Judge for concluding the exercise.

c)   Scoring the Retrieve over the A frame Exercise. Scoring of this exercise begins when the Judge acknowledges the handler to start. The primary area the Judge is evaluating for obtaining the most points is the willingness of the dog to scale the A frame retrieve the object and the control the handler displays over the dog. The Judge awards the most points to a dog that demonstrates eagerness, willingness, speed and enthusiasm to scale the A frame and retrieve the selected object.

Note: Mouthing the object slightly is not a fault and excessive mouthing will have a maximum one point deduction providing the dog does not drop the retrieved object prior to the handler taking it from the dog.

1)   Non-qualifying (Zero) Score. The following must be given a zero score on this exercise:

a.   Dog refuses to go out on the second command;

b.   Dog does not retrieve the object;

c.   Dog does not scale the A Frame at least one direction;

d.   Handler moves from the stationary position when the object is thrown;

e.   Dog refuses to release the object; or

f.     Handler uses any form of rough correction to get the dog to release the retrieved object.

2)   Imperfections may be judged as major or minor depending on the extent of the following:

a.   Dog only scales the A frame in one direction;

b.   Handler gives extra verbal or signal command(s);

c.   Dog is very slow or reluctant in performing the exercise;

d.   Dog leaves the handler’s side prior to giving the command to retrieve;

e.   Dog sits too far back from the handler to comfortably take the object from the dog;

f.     Dog is very slow in releasing the object or a double command is given; or

g.   Dog drops the object prior to the handler taking it from the dog’s mouth.

h.   Dog demonstrates pressure or reluctance to perform the exercise;

i.     Speed of the retrieve going and coming is significantly different;

j.     Mouthing the object to a point the object is difficult for the handler to retrieve from the dog;

k.   Dog is slow in its release or the object must be pulled slightly;

l.     Dog sits crooked or returns to the basic position;

m. Handler help or assistance that deviates slightly from the ideal;

n.   Dog’s pick-up of the object is slow; or

o.   Dog doesn’t go directly to the object and return directly to the handler with the object. The deduction depends on the degree of deviation from the most direct route.

Concluding the obedience routine for both dog/handler teams. The obedience routine is complete when both dog handler/teams have completed all required exercises. The Judge indicates a location for both dog/handler teams to report for their score and critique. The handlers report with their dogs on leash and halt with their dogs maintaining a “sit” in the basic position, handlers should then command their dogs into a “down” position while waiting for their score and critique. Dogs should display proper control during the critique and when exiting from the field. As much as a two point deduction can be assessed for dogs that display lack of control during the critique or when entering or leaving the field.

Note: The Judge’s score is final. Respect and good sportsmanship must be displayed by all parties at all times.